Return not arrived back


#1

I have a buyer claiming to have returned an item to me but it has not arrived back.

He has no tracking but has sent me a receipt showing that he has spent £3.70 at the post office.

Anyone know how Amazon views this?

Will they come down against me should the buyer make a claim of some sort?

Will they remove a negative feedback if/when it arrives?

Thanks


#2

Hi Paul

As I understand it:

If it’s a £3.70, it’s a First Class small parcel up to 1Kg and it should have a Referene Number on the Proof of Posting (receipt) which you can use on the Royal Mail Site: Track & Trace to see what they think has happened to it (effectively it’s tracking)

If that doesn’t help find it, your customer will have to put a claim for the missing item into the Post Office (for them to reimburse your customer) - in the same way as we Sellers are responsible until our items reach the Customers, they are responsible until a return reaches us!

Hope that helps

Brian


#3

Actually, strictly speaking, the customer only needs to provide proof of postage and not tracking.
So legally, they can claim that it was sent back and even though it’s not been received, can expect a refund.
It’s not a particularly fair aspect of the law, but I guess it’s to protect buyers from sellers that are less than honest.
I’m not 100% sure as to how Amazon will view it, but at best I think you have the likelihood of an Amazon paid A-Z claim.


#4

There is no tracking on the receipt and there is no evidence that the shipping relates to me ie. no postcode etc.

I am pretty sure Amazon will just find against me so I guess I will just have to pay up.

Just another part of the great Amazon selling experience.


#5

So it’s just a receipt for the postage paid and not a combined receipt/proof of posting. Could have sent the parcel anywhere, possibly/probably back to himself! Defend any claim on the basis that the seller has not provided any evidence of having returned the item but you will refund if it ever arrives

EDIT: May not even have been your goods he posted, of course!


#6

That is what I would do with the other auction site. That was why asked the question as I am not sure how Amazon will react.

I am normally fairly pessimistic about Amazon supporting the seller but I thought I would check if anyone had any experience of this.


#7

Hi Neil,

Thanks for your contribution, but can you provide a reference for that, as I would like to research ?

Thank You
EHO


#8

Start here, but if you want to really dig into it, you need to look at Consumer contract regulations.


#9

Amazon would normally expect tracking to show the return was sent/delivered, I doubt they would act on a receipt, or buyers claim they sent it back, rather than ‘proof of posting receipt’ which would show your postcode, even the buyer would need this pop if they wanted to claim on RM for it’s loss.

As Amazon expect sellers to provide evidence of delivery on INR claims, they also expect from buyers evidence of a return (tracking shows as sent) I don’t see a p.o. receipt with just a cost as acceptable proof of return.


#10

I know this sounds pedantic but proof of postAGE is exactly that, evidence of having paid for postage. What the buyer needs is proof of postING, ie evidence of sending something to a specific address (house number+postcode). In this case, the buyer only has the former. Being cynical, I suspect the buyer knew exactly what they were doing - just asking for (or even insisting on) only a cash receipt. PO counter staff usually offer proof of posting automatically, with a separate cash receipt as an optional extra


#11

Proof of postage is proof of posting and not a receipt. They are different things.

The form they use is required to have at least the postcode being sent to.
And I believe the type of parcel/letter etc.


#12

All these replies , whilst speaking sense, are off topic. I really want to know how Amazon will apply the rules. Unfortunately it sounds like this does not happen often so no one has any experience.

Amazon should find in my favour and protect me from any negative feedback but I just don’t think they will.


#13

Sorry, Neil. I’ve got a proof of posting in front of me - the wording is “Certificate of posting”. As I said, a receipt only proves that you have paid for postage, not that you have actually posted any specific item

POs no longer used pre-printed forms for Certificates of posting - they always come off their computer system and, as you say, do include postcode and type of item. In Paul73’s case, if there’s no postcode and no type of item, it’s just a receipt - proof of postAGE, not proof of postING


#14

Unfortunately, nor do we. We are just trying to give you advice on how to defend or appeal a decision by Amazon


#15

Going back to this question, the answer is No, because it won’t meet their criteria for removal (unless it’s very abusive or uses profanity). It will be a reflection of the customer’s experience of buying from you and is therefore legitimate feedback, even if what the customer says is wrong or misleading. All you can do is post a polite response giving your side of the story


#16

Hello Paul73,

Did the Customer raise a formal Return Request? did you aiuthorise the Return?

As I understand the rules you do not need to issue a refund until you have the returned item and can assess it against what was sent.

But from what you say it’s likeley that the item has not been returned…

Regret I do not think you can do anything about the Customer’s feedback unless it infringes Az’s rules on feeback which mightb then allow removal

Sorry, but like any of us in this situation, you’re stuck with what the customer feedsback and you can post your response…

All Best

Brian


#17

we had one of these
buyer opened a-z as we had refunded - appealed stating buyer did not provide tracking for return - amazon refunded them


#18

sorry dont understand what you are saying did you refund or amazon? and if you refunded why did they open an AtoZ?


#19

No we didn’t refund as we didn’t receive our items back and the buyer refused to show any proof that they had actually returned anything. They opened an a-z and we represented our case arguing that if a seller has to provide tracking to win an a-z, then so should a buyer. Amazon closed off the a-z. We didn’t get a hit on our metrics and Amazon refunded their payment not us.


#20

Did they leave a negative feedback?